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Incident Reporting in Healthcare Guide: A Step Towards Improved Patient Safety

Abishek Goda
Incident Reporting in Healthcare: The Complete Guide in 2021 by Quasr.

Hypothetically, if you ask someone where you are likely more going to meet with an accident — in a hospital or while driving a car — most people will say hospitals are the most unlikely place to get injured.  

Unfortunately, the actual medical situation is a bit different compared to a hypothetical situation. According to a 2015 study by the UK National Health Services (NHS), it is believed that 10% of critical accidents occur in all hospitals. 

Even the World Health Organisation (WHO) has estimated that 20-40% of global healthcare spending goes waste due to poor quality of care. This poor healthcare quality leads to the death of more than 138 million patients every year. 

Patient safety in hospitals is in danger due to human errors and unsafe procedures. Everyone makes mistakes, even good doctors and nurses. However, by recording these mistakes, analysing and following up, we can avoid the future occurrence of mistakes/accidents.

To err is human, they say. The best thing we can do as humans is to learn from these mistakes and avoid repeating them in the future. When we adopt this feedback approach in hospitals and other healthcare spaces, we can improve patient safety in healthcare.

Knowing why, when, and how to report an incident can help improve patients, hospital staff, and organizations’ safety. This guide will walk you through all the different aspects of incident reporting in healthcare. It will show how to file an accurate incident report to establish high healthcare standards worldwide. 

What Does Incident Reporting in the Healthcare System Means?

To err is human, to cover up is unforgivable, and to fail to learn is inexcusable.”

Prof Liam Donaldson (WHO Envoy for Patient Safety)

An incident is an unfavourable event that affects patient or staff safety. The typical healthcare incidents are related to physical injuries, medical errors, equipment failure, administration, patient care, or others. In short, anything that endangers a patient’s or staff’s safety is called an incident in the medical system. 

The process of collecting incident data and presenting it properly to action is known as ‘Incident Reporting in Healthcare.’ With incident reporting, an emerging problem is highlighted in a non-blaming way to provide a catalyst for changing the factors contributing to the error. 

Designated staff with authority to file a report, or staff who has witnessed an incident firsthand, usually file the Incident report. Usually, nurses or other hospital staff file the report within 24 to 48 hours after the incident occurred. The outcomes improve by recording incidents while the memories of the event are still fresh. 

When To Write Incident Reports in Hospitals?

When an event results in an injury to a person or damage to property, incident reporting becomes a must. Unfortunately, for every medical error, almost 100 errors remain unreported. There are many reasons for unreported medical incidents, but not knowing when to report is one of the most common ones. 

Unfortunately, many patients and hospital employees do not have a clear idea about which incidents to report. Knowing when to report in hospitals can boost safety standards to a great extent. Let’s consider three situations:

1. A nurse is helping a patient walk from his bed to the bathroom. However, he stubs the big toe on his left foot on the IV pole that he is dragging. 

2. While injected the accident patient’s IV with pain medication, the nurse misread the label and administered a heavy dosage than prescribed, which increased the patient’s blood pressure level. 

In these situations, it is necessary to fill in the incident reports. Simply because an unexpected event occurred and lead to harm, it doesn’t matter how severe or minor the incident is. It is essential to report all incidents.

Purpose of Incident Reports

Incident reports provide valuable information to hospital admin facilities. They capture data required to highlight necessary measures to improve the overall safety and quality of the hospital. An accurate incident report serves multiple purposes, such as:

#1 Root Cause Identification

All incidents have a cause. Mishaps are pretty uncommon in hospital settings, and most incidents can be root caused to a potential reason. Correcting the root causes can easily avoid future incidents of that type. In this sense, root cause analysis of an incident is an essential investigation step for all hospitals to ensure their staff and patients are safe under most conditions.

#2 Policy and Process Improvements

Some incidents are part of a larger pattern that can only be identified by looking at them together – let’s say, for example, through a Swiss cheese analysis model. Such assessments usually identify more significant issues that aren’t immediately apparent from individual incident reports or investigations. These assessments feed into clinical risk management as well as helps guide the hospital administrators to tweak their policy or process guidelines to help staff adhere to a safer care routine. 

For example, let’s take a pattern of incidents. Each has a root cause individually to what looks like a handover issue – but at different stages or different type of facilities. It would be possible to tweak each of these handover processes individually to fix that specific issue. However, it may be more productive to improve the overall handover process by taking all the incidents as a whole and tweak to address them together. 

#3 Clinical Risk Management

All hospitals have and use their enterprise risk management processes. Clinical risk management, a subset of healthcare risk management, uses incident reports as essential data points. Risk management aims to ensure the hospital administrators know their institution performance and identify addressable issues that increase their exposure. And the ability to assess clinical risks ensure the hospitals can stay ahead in their business and provide high-quality care and a safe workplace for all staff.

#4 Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI)

All hospitals have continuous improvement plans that help them stay updated with all the latest developments in patient safety and quality by assessing, evaluating and improving their processes and methods over time. Having incident reports duly filled and followed up to closure helps the CQI process to identify potential areas of improvement and help the organisation achieve a more successful CQI cycle that takes them forward.

#5 Better Training and Continuous Learning

Incident data are essential sources of knowledge and on-the-job training material. Incident investigation is a rich source of information that will help new staff understand why the hospital has a specific process that may differ from their previous workplaces. Similarly, having a robust incident management system helps implement a good continuous learning program for the staff that helps them learn the most important details they need to be efficient in their day-to-day work.

Different Types of Incident Reporting in Healthcare

An incident is an unfavourable event in health organisations. But, the nature of the incident can vary based on numerous circumstantial factors. Broadly, there are four types of incident reports:

#1 Clinical Incidents

A clinical incident is an unpleasant and unplanned event that causes or can cause physical harm to a patient. These incidents are harmful in nature; they can severely harm a person or damage the property. For example—

  • A patient falls out of bed while sleeping. 
  • A patient brutally scratched a nurse while she was taking his temperature. 
  • Nurse mislabelled the medicine box while storing it. 

#2 Near Miss Incidents

Sometimes an error/unsafe condition is caught before it reaches the patient. Such incidents are called “near-miss” incidents. However, the problem might have diffused before the severe harm, but it is still essential to report near-miss incidents. Nearly 50 near-miss incidents occur for each injury reported. For example— 

  • A nurse notices the bedrail is not up when the patient is asleep and fixes it
  • A checklist call caught an incorrect medicine dispensation before administration. 
  • A patient attempts to leave the facility before discharge, but the security guard stopped him and brought him back to the ward. 

#3 Non Clinical Incidents

Non-clinical incidents include events, incidents, and near-misses related to a failure or breach of EH&S, regardless of who is injured or involved. For example—

  • Misplaced documentation or documents were inter-changed between patient files. 
  • A security mishap at a facility. 

#4 Workplace Incidents

A work accident, occupational incident, or accident at work is a discrete occurrence that can lead to physical or mental occupational injury. The workplace incidents are related to mental as well as physical hurts. According to the BLS’s Workplace Injuries and Illness News, nursing assistant jobs have the highest incidence rates. For example—

  • Patient or next-of-kin abuses a care provider – verbally or physically – leading to unsafe work conditions. 
  • A healthcare provider suffered a needle prick while disposing of a used needle.  

Who Prepares Incident Reports in Healthcare Facilities?

At QUASR, we believe all staff (and patients, too) should be able to report incidents or potential incidents they have witnessed. But in practice, it is a bit different. Some hospitals have designated persons who are authorised to file the reports. In some other hospitals, the staff usually updates their supervisor about an incident, then can file the report. 

QUASR clients, usually, have configured to give access to all their staff so that they can initiate an incident report enabling them to stay aware of all the issues that occur – however minor or inappropriate it may be. Allowing all staff to report requires a training effort from the quality and safety teams to ensure all the employees understand what and when to file an incident report.

Preparing incident reports in a healthcare facility

Critical Components of Incident Report

One comprehensive incident report should answer all the basic questions — who, what, where, when, and how. Most hospitals follow a preset reporting format based on their organisational needs. However, an incident report must cover the following aspects:

#1 General Information

The well-informed incident report needs basic information such as the date and time of the incident. Additionally, for future analysis, your report must include general information, like:

#2 Location of the Incident

Specifically, mention the location of the incident and the particular area within the property—for example, patient X fell in Ward no. 2 near the washroom. With the location specifications, administration staff can better investigate the reason behind the incident and fix it.

#3 Concise yet Detailed Incident Description

The incident description needs to be clear and meaningful — don’t use vague language, never add baseless information, and keep personal biases out. Whenever you have to add your opinion to the report, mark it as an assumption or subjective opinion.

#4 Type of the Incident

You should define the nature of the incident while reporting to get a clear view. We can categorise the hospital incidents into different sections such as Medication Error, Patient Fall, Equipment Damage, Abuse, Pressure Ulcer, Radiation, Surgery/Anesthesia, Laboratory related, Security, Harassment, Loss or damage to property, Patient Identification, among others. QUASR offers 25 such incident types built-in by default.

#5 Information of all Parties Involved in the Incident

The administration needs the name and contact details of all the parties involved in the incident. The report should capture all the relevant information required to follow up with the involved parties.

#6 Witness Testimonies

If there are witnesses available to the incident, it will be helpful to add their statements in your report. While writing witness statements, focus on the following attributes — specific details provided related to the incident, use quotation marks to frame their accounts, note witnesses’ location at the time of the incident, and how they are related to the incident.

#7 Level of Injury

In case of injury, the reporting staff must record the injury level and cause in the report. If the incident involves an in-patient at the hospital, their medical records will reflect the treatment and diagnosis of the injury. However, for others, it might be required to follow up and record their injury diagnoses.

#8 Follow Up

The incident report is incomplete without the follow-up action details. Each report should include remarks stating what preventive measurements and tactics you have opted to avoid such incidents in the future. 

#9 Reviews

Once a final follow-up on the incident report is made, the next phase is reviewing. In this step, the supervisor or manager ensures the implementation of corrective actions against the report. The goal of the review is to prevent the recurrence of the incident and create immediate action plans. While reviewing incident reports, a reviewer should consider the following things:

#10 SBAR

SBAR abbreviates Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendations. The reporting person’s supervisor at the time of the incident typically performs SBAR. SBAR attempts to capture more structured information about the incident, what happened, pre-conditions leading to the incident, information about the patient or staff, if involved, a first assessment of what caused the incident, and recommendations for follow-up or corrective actions. 

#11 Risk Scoring

A risk score is a calculated number that reflects the severity of risk due to some factors. We compute risk scores as a factor of probability and impact. It is common in the industry to use a 5×5 risk scoring matrix. But there are other methods too, and sometimes the scoring changes based on the type and nature of the incident.

#12 Investigation Information

An investigator or an investigation team needs to go through all the supporting evidence to analyse the incident. The incident supporting comes in different forms, such as photos, CCTV footage, and witness statements. It is essential to verify the supporting evidence during an investigation. Information investigation often leads to:

#13 Root Cause Analysis

Root cause analysis is a problem-solving method used to identify the root cause of the problem. The typical output of the RCA step is a set of contributing factors that then indicate systemic issues that may be addressed together by policy or process changes.

Standard RCA tools used in the industry include the Five Why method, Ishikawa, or the Fishbone Analysis. Some cases use more advanced techniques like the Swiss cheese model or PRISMA.

#14 Contributing Factors

Contributing factors are those factors that influenced a single event or multiple events to cause an incident. If contributing factors are accelerated, it will affect the severity of the consequences. Therefore, with the knowledge of contributing factors, management can eliminate them to prevent similar incidents from occurring in the future. 

QUASR implements a form of the London Protocol for capturing these factors.

#15 Executive Summary

The compelling executive summary is the final step in the incident reporting. It is a short document produced for management purposes. It summarises a more extended report so that readers can quickly become acquainted with the material. Management can get a crisp reading of the incident from the executive summaries without reading the entire report. 

Benefits of Patients Safety Reporting

Through healthcare data analysis, setting the correct key performance indicators in your organisation becomes simpler. Here are some vital benefits that you can gain from reporting:

#1 Preventive Measures

One of the most powerful elements of an incident report is streamlining historical and current data to spot potential incidents in advance. Using predictive analysis, healthcare facilities can improve the quality of patient care and reduce workplace mishaps. Around 60% of healthcare leaders have confirmed that adopting predictive analytics has improved their efficiency considerably. 

#2 Disease Monitoring

Disease monitoring is one aspect of the first predictive analytics. With the incident reports, healthcare organisations can monitor potential disease outbreaks by using past and present metrics. 

During COVID-19, many hospitals have struggled to prevent disease outbreaks on their premises. But, the organisations that have insightful data with them may have managed the pandemic outbreak a lot easier. 

#3 Cost Reduction

Reporting can also make healthcare operations more economically effective. By gathering and analyzing incident data daily, hospitals’ can keep themselves out of legal troubles. A comprehensive medical error study compared 17 Southeastern Asian countries’ medical and examined how poor reporting increases the financial burden on healthcare facilities. 

#4 Enhanced Patient Safety

Improving patient safety is the ultimate goal of incident reporting. From enhancing safety standards to reducing medical errors, incident reporting helps create a sustainable environment for your patients. Eventually, when your hospital offers high-quality patient care, it will build a brand of goodwill. 

Healthcare Incident Reporting Challenges

Healthcare incident reporting has various managerial and safety-related benefits. To create a result-driven incident report, you have to cross the next hurdles also:

#1 Paper-based Reporting

In this technology era, many healthcare organisations still rely upon traditional paper-based reporting. Paper-based reporting is a manual approach where the incident details are recorded and managed using paper and often hand-written reports.

Paper-based reporting has numerous disadvantages, including low-quality data, limited flexibility, costly process, error-prone, time-consuming, and more. Get started digitizing your incident data by downloading our Excel-based Incident Reporting Template and quickly replace paper-based reporting. We even have a post explaining the template and how you can benefit from it.

#2 Underreporting

The problem of underreporting is widespread in the healthcare industry. Common causes of underreporting include:

1) Lack of awareness about when and what to report.

2) Fear of repercussions from colleagues or seniors. 

The reason behind underreporting might vary, but no one can deny that it is the biggest reporting challenge. We had written a detailed article on our assessment of under-reporting in our blog.

According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, all healthcare facilities should offer a simple and anonymous reporting way to their staff. QUASR has built-in features to encourage reporting in a pseudo-anonymous manner encouraging staff to file a report without fear. 

#3 Busy Schedule

The busiest hospital personnel, nurses, and doctors are mainly responsible for filing incident reports. Due to their busy and often overworked schedule, they sometimes fail to report incidents. A solution must factor in this constraint at the time of design and implementation to ensure all incidents are recorded in a timely fashion without over-burdening the staff.

Conclusion

After understanding the purpose, benefits, and challenges of incident reporting in healthcare, it is clear that reporting is essential for medical facilities. Whether you wish to improve patient safety or reduce workplace mishaps, incident reporting can serve multiple purposes. But, compiling, reviewing, and investigating incidents in a timely and unbiased fashion isn’t a simple task. 

You require an automatic incident reporting system to manage hundreds of incidents at any given time. We can say that QUASR has practical tools to help you create-track-analyse incident reports. QUASR is easy to use and access, which allows fast and accurate incident reporting. 

We have various elements in our software for resilient healthcare incident reporting ensuring all the best practices. To better understand what QUASR can do for you, book a free demo today

Also, please stay connected with us as we will be covering more topics related to healthcare incident reporting. Meanwhile, feel free to contact us for further information!

An Introduction to QUASR Basic

Abishek Goda

When we brainstormed the QUASR Lite design, we had a list of features for another version that’s slightly more advanced than Lite but not as involved as the Enterprise version. Even amidst our customers and prospects, we understand Lite is a little too simple for their process because they have had a computerised system in place for a while and are familiar with the advantages of having one. They need to upgrade but are not ready to set aside budgets or time for enterprise implementation. So we built QUASR Basic to give you a flavour for what the enterprise system can do for you without having to go through full implementation. There are limitations, of course. In this post, allow us to introduce QUASR Basic to you.

QUASR Basic is Lite with a workflow

QUASR Basic is Lite with a workflow. It does not have all Enterprise version features and will probably remain that way for more time. BASIC and Enterprise target different types of organisations. BASIC targets single/independent hospitals, which are:
1) accustomed to having a system in place.
2) using Lite for a while and want to graduate their process.
3) Enterprise-ready users who wish to try QUASR before taking on an enterprise implementation.

I hope we convinced you to read on, as this might be just what you need at your org right now.

What do we mean by a workflow anyway? In Lite, when you report an incident, the system doesn’t do much apart from saving it to a database and ensuring the data’s integrity. In BASIC, however, a few things happen: the system triggers an email to a pre-designated group of Quality Managers as soon as you report an incident. The incident details collected also contain additional information such as the Supervisor for the incident, a team of investigators, a group of people to sign off on the incident etc. Each of these is a stage in the incident lifecycle. The Supervisor assigned is then required to perform the review and fill in the SBAR. Similarly, upon quality review completion, the investigation report can be updated and so on. This linearising sequence of events in the incident lifecycle is what we call the “workflow”.

There’s more

But that’s not all of it either. There are more things under the hood in BASIC as compared to Lite. Flags assigned to incidents in Lite are merely indicators. They help you identify or classify incidents at a glance. However, in BASIC, you can use Flags to include pre-designated people in the incident loop. They’d automatically get notifications and access to the incident details.

Similarly, you can add other users to the incident and notify them of the occurrence – voluntarily. These might be other department heads or an HR supervisor or a Line supervisor instead of the department supervisor. These users would otherwise not have access to the incident or its details.

One last thing to highlight about Basic would be the “Sensitive Incidents” feature. We will write a detailed note on sensitive incidents in another post in the future. But for now, sensitive incidents are a type of flag that limits the access on the incidents to a pre-determined group of users – Quality Managers, investigators and other management level users. QUASR does not have an opinion on how or when to use this flag. We leave it to our customers to use it as they see fit in their organisation.

QUASR Basic vs QUASR Enterprise

Lastly, as I mentioned, BASIC is Lite with a workflow. But how does Basic compare to Enterprise? Enterprise, as the name suggests, is unlimited in many ways. Enterprise targets a group of institutions as opposed to independent hospitals or providers. A group have other requirements in terms of uniformity of process across their participant hospitals. They tend to prefer a single cluster implementation where the group management can get their dashboard with the essential information they need about the overall incident performance. BASIC, on the other hand, does not support a cluster implementation. There are other differences in terms of support access, implementation, customisation provisions in Enterprise that aren’t available in Basic. For more information, feel free to reach us out, and we’d be able to give you even more clarity on both these versions and options.

Why should you keep your process simple

Abishek Goda

“Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.” – A quote often attributed to Nobel winning Physicist Albert Einstein.

Incident Management process is often quite simple. The process provides a lot of information beyond incidents themselves and are essential inputs for overall clinical risk management as well. In many cases, the knowledge that the incident management process is a first step to overall risk management is sufficient to drive us into analysis paralysis mode. Risk management is a very complex topic and has far too many factors in its implementation. We, at QUASR, have insights into clinical risk management and we will eventually integrate QUASR to provide this option for our clients. In this post, we want to address some of the common complications in implementing an incident management system and our solutions.

QUASR follows an industry-standard workflow for incident management. We implement a simple workflow and we are pretty proud of that fact. We believe we have achieved the simplest possible standard workflow that also captures the essence of incident management itself. However, during enterprise implementations, clients usually need quite a bit of convincing as to why this simple workflow is usually a good place for their needs. From our experience, this happens in two cases: when the clients have a legacy system that they have used for a while and are looking to keep the same process. Or they are looking to map their existing manual flow as-is into the new system. Both these approaches, frankly, are inefficient. Let us explain.

Legacy System Hangover

Systems that were built at least a decade back qualify as legacy systems. Any reasonably newer system might not have the issues that we are going to discuss here. For newer systems, the IT team was likely asked to implement their manual process as is! In software circles, there is an inside joke – “some unexplained bugs are actually features.”. On a more serious note, systems that were implemented a long time back don’t fully take advantage of all the technological developments of the recent times. Some of their design decisions could have been technology driven rather than user driven simply because it would be prohibitively difficult to implement differently. A newer system built on more recent technologies don’t suffer from the same limitations. And hence it is possible to achieve more elegant solutions or workflows than wasn’t possible in a legacy system. That said, if we carried forward the legacy system as is, we might not fully utilize all the enhancements that technology offers us.

Mapping Manual Process to Digital Process

Since many of our customers are implementing their first digital system for incident management, this is the typical set of issues we face while onboarding and customizations. Many things we do manually, do not scale well to digital systems as such. And we all have seen examples of this: have you ever tried to collect all people interested in paying for a gift to a colleague? We send out an excel sheet and each person returns a sheet of their own and we merge them manually? That’s exactly what we’d do before emails. We’d just go person to person, find out if they’d contribute and write it down in a piece of paper. But we all do know how inefficient that is, right? If we have to do the same thing today, we should probably setup a google form that each of the participant fills out and you get an excel sheet at the end of it. Same data is collected but far less work needs to be done by the person trying to collect it. The second option is a more digital native way of solving that problem. Incident management, incidentally, is full of such problems.

A typical example we often get as a customization request is to include additional workflow steps: include HoD as part of the workflow. Yes, we understand why you’d want to do that. But in many cases and as many of our customers agree too, this step is an FYI for the person involved. In a manual system, the HoD had no way of knowing what was happening unless you intentionally ran things by them. But digital systems aren’t really like that. Online systems even lesser so. You’d just need to notify them in these cases. In QUASR, we solve this problem by automatically having HoDs in the loop for all incidents in their department. You don’t need to do this additionally. However, we do not notify them every single time. EMail based notifications have become so common that we mindlessly mark things read or archive them even without reading them. And we do not want to add to the inbox clutter either. So the HoDs just have to login periodically and they’d be updated on all the active incidents in their department. But unless we explain this, most of the users don’t see the solution. They are wondering how to implement an additional step in the workflow because that’s what they do in the manual flow.

Another example is typically around data collection fields. Many clients request adding quite a few descriptive fields whereas these aren’t very useful for systematic analysis. Descriptive data necessitates quality managers or investigators to spend time reading and understanding much information. But there is another downside: lack of sufficient information. Some people can describe an incident in vivid details while others tend to write very little. Situations like these can be avoided by collecting quantifiable, standardized data instead. This, too, is an artifact of using paper based forms. In paper based forms, it is impractical to collect incident type specific information for every incident type we want to track. So we end up with a few generic descriptive boxes for the users to fill up. However, adopting the same to a digital system does not allow you to utilize the full power of a digitalized solution.

Adopt Digitally Native Solutions

We just saw a few reasons why users typically have difficult-to-use, complex workflows in a digital system. But its not entirely their fault. As service providers, our first mantra is “Customer is always right!”. Blindly following the mantra, however, does very little to help the customer. While the customers know what they want, it is our duty to explain and clarify how best to provide what they want. Users tend to get carried away at the flexibility and try to plan for a future well ahead. It is worth remembering that technology evolves faster than our processes. So it is not very useful to plan far ahead into the future but plan for medium to short term only.

Enhancing software solutions are often quite simple and needn’t be as expensive either. Hence it is better to implement enhancements when the need arise rather than implement them all at once. Besides, having a digital native solution allows us to adapt to a digitalized workflow better – especially moving from a legacy or a paper-based system. Once we have acclimatized to a digitalized solution, we are better suited to decide how we need to enhance our systems in the future.

A brief introduction to Lite

Abishek Goda

When we launched QUASR a couple of years back, our motivation was to create an enterprise incident management software specifically for healthcare organizations in this region (South-East Asia). Having over a decade of experience working with the big guys in this region, we have an excellent understanding of what the big solutions did to service the big guys as well. In some sense, we were uniquely positioned to generate value. But we also figured that the big organizations are well serviced and tended to have very complex requirements on their tools. So our entire vision was to bridge the gap for medium-sized hospitals. To date, all our customers say they are pleased about their implementation of QUASR, which is unique to their organization and processes.

In early 2020, the pandemic hit. The pandemic meant a lot of the healthcare organisations had to start working remotely too. Much non-frontline work had to go remote in an environment that is traditionally not trained to work remote. While our solution is perfect for organisations to take their quality process online and remote, our solution wasn’t armed to help the smaller or niche, healthcare providers. Some of these providers have not evolved to have their quality processes, have a paper-form based flow but do not have volumes to warranty a separate software or are very early to benefit from even a mid-sized solution like QUASR. The features in QUASR, though, strategic and straightforward, is sometimes far more involved and complex for an organisation that is just getting started on this path.

That’s the genesis story for QUASR Lite. QUASR Lite is aimed at organizations that are just getting started on an incident management process. Whether you have a simple paper-form method or looking to create your own structure and process, Lite has you covered. QUASR Lite is unopinionated in that it does not enforce a workflow. 

What is QUASR Lite?

QUASR Lite is an online incident repository. It is a simple data capture tool and allows you to capture the incident data in a structured format. It makes your life easy to gather incident statistics and generate reports. Want to know how it works? Here is how.

You could very well do the same with an excel sheet. And we would have to agree. But the main advantage Lite brings to you over vanilla excel sheets is that: we have thought this one out for you. We have built it specifically for hospital incident scenarios. We consolidated our experience working with many hospitals and created a starter tool that will grow with you as you mature to bigger and more involved processes.

Who is QUASR Lite for?

Lite perfectly suits small hospitals, clinics, speciality hospitals, nursing homes and care centres and individual hospitals, that are either:

  • New to incident management 
  • Looking forward to digitalising their incident data; 
  • Looking to get started with a starter tool and graduate to more complex tools along the way. 

Lite takes all these scenarios into account. There are some opinionated decisions we have made in Lite, though. Lite is primarily meant as a tool for the Quality Management team. So we limited the number of user licenses to 5 per account. Ideally, 5 seats are plenty enough to have quality managers and even senior management from your hospital. Also, since Lite is for a closed team of Quality Managers, we don’t have email notifications baked in. We believe that if it is your primary tool for work, you might not want to be notified of every small action. However, this might change in the future. There are other uniquely designed features that we’ll go over in individual posts over the next couple of weeks.

Join the community

Lite is an evolving product. The first version which is taking trial requests now is the first feature-complete version. We will be adding an overall roadmap of features to Lite over the next several quarters. But more importantly, we believe that its users will drive the roadmap for Lite. We built the enterprise version of QUASR, ‘QUASR Enterprise’ the same way – based on customers’ direct feedback, their specific needs and requests. So we don’t see why Lite is any different. So if you want a product that suits your process, get on the train right now and help build the product you need.

Check out more features of QUASR Lite. You can sign up for a 30-day free trial here.

World Patient Safety Day 2020

Abishek Goda

WHO designated 17 September to be celebrated as World Patient Safety Day (WPSD) in 2019. The theme for this year’s WPSD is “Health Worker Safety: A Priority for Patient Safety”. As we all agree, there couldn’t be a better time to discuss this topic when health workers, globally, brave the pandemic facing distressing safety risks.

We, at QUASR, spent quite a while brainstorming how we should celebrate this event. After much discussion, we decided the right thing to do would be to gather valuable learnings from leaders in the industry and share them with the community at large. As an advocate of patient safety, we feel this is a way we can do our bit to share actionable insights from across the region so everyone can adopt or tune their processes.

We kickstarted our WPSD 2020 celebrations with a thought-provoking chat with Dr. Juan Lucas Rosas of the FV Hospital, Vietnam. We spoke to leaders in Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, and more. While we are working to bring all this content to you, we invite you to share your thoughts, suggestions, feedback, or frankly, corrections.

Stay tuned to read them all. Or see them all, yes! we do have exclusive videos too